Disability Minute Segment Archive

Produced by people with disabilities at Chicago Lighthouse Media and airing on WBBM Newsradio 780 AM & 105.9 FM.

 

Air Date: September 26, 2021
Mitigating Diabetes’s Disabling Effects


Type-2 Diabetes is a growing health concern in the U.S., and its long-term effects can lead to several disabling conditions. But there are ways to prevent this disease and its effects. I’m Sandy Murillo with “The Disability Minute.”

According to the CDC, one in three adults are at risk for diabetes, especially those who are overweight, or have a family history of the disease. For those at-risk, Lucia Flores, of the Illinois Public Health Institute, offers these tips.

“Eating raw, whole fruits. Drinking more water. In terms of incorporating physical activity, the recommendations are 30 minutes five days a week.”

Resources like Chicago CARES to Prevent Diabetes offer additional information that can help prevent and manage diabetes.

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. Sandy Murillo for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

For more information click here.

 

Air Date: September 19, 2021
Making Convenience Accessible

More industries are relying on self-service technology, so what can be done to make sure everyone can serve themselves? I’m Ben Chargot with the disability minute.

Self-checkouts in grocery stores and touch-screen fast-food ordering kiosks make the retail experience more convenient – and faster – for many consumers. But many of these options are neither accessible nor intuitive for people with visual impairments.

Integrated screen readers can provide audio guides for touch screens. According to Ray Campbell, Senior Accessibility Analyst for United Airlines, one way to encourage businesses to incorporate this technology is by acknowledging those that already do.

“We complain enough, and I think it’s just as important that we also commend those that are doing the right thing. I think it’s important that not only do we commend companies for doing that, but that we use those things.”

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. Ben Chargot for NewsRadio 1059 WBBM.

 

Air Date: September 12, 2021
Long-Haul COVID Relief Under the A.D.A.

Recently, President Biden indicated that people living with long-term health complications from COVID may be entitled to protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Why? And what may qualify? I’m Maureen Reid with “The Disability Minute.”

While contracting COVID itself does not qualify for protections under the ADA, those who have “long-haul COVID” symptoms such as Brain Fog and difficulty breathing may ask for certain accommodations.

A student who has difficulty concentrating may ask for extended test times. Or, a customer who has difficulty standing for long periods of times may request that a place be held in line while they sit.

Wondering if you qualify? The civil rights divisions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Justice are offering guidance on their websites.

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. I’m Maureen Reid for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9FM.

For more information click here.

 

Air Date: September 5, 2021
CPS’s IEP Backlog Leaves Students with Disabilities Hanging

Chicago Public Schools has resumed full-time, in-person instruction for the first time in more than a year. How has this long break affected children with special needs? I’m Sandy Murillo with “The Disability Minute.”

According to Chalkbeat.org, more than 17-hundred C-P-S students with special needs could not get their Individualized Education Programs reissued during the last school year. Those programs are legal documents guaranteeing resources and supports. Amanda Klemas, an attorney with Equip for Equality, says the district should create a plan to ensure these students get the services they need.

“We’re sort of leaving our most-vulnerable students hanging, and so we need to figure out a way to correct that so that they’re not put at a major disadvantage as they’re continuing to move through their education.”

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. Sandy Murillo for Newsradio 1059 WBBM.

For more information, click here.

 

Air Date: August 29, 2021
Media Representation Matters

How does media representation impact the perception of people with disabilities? I’m Ben Chargot with “The Disability Minute.”

The way people with disabilities are portrayed on screen can either support negative stereotypes or debunk them. A 2018 study evaluating 280 network and streaming television shows found disability “almost always portrayed as an undesirable, depressing and limiting state.”

“Most people in the world don’t know any blind people, and so these representations on tv and the movies are often many people’s only encounter and engagement with disability.” That’s Andrew Leland, who has published several articles on the topic.

There may be some progress. Earlier this year, 80 Hollywood stars and industry figures signed an open letter calling for disability representation in all forms of media.

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. Ben Chargot for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

 

Air Date: August 22, 2021
Is working from home a reasonable accommodation?

Like others, people with disabilities have benefitted from working remotely during the pandemic.  Whether they can continue to do so is not guaranteed. I’m Sandy Murillo with “The Disability Minute.”

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers are obligated to provide reasonable accommodations in the workplace. While there is no concrete definition of what that means, Peter Berg, of the Great Lakes ADA Center, says accommodations must be directly related to job duties and performance.

“They’re not obligated to provide the specific accommodation an employee requests. Nor are they required to provide what amounts to a preference.”

“An employee with a disability may prefer to work from home because they like it, but that’s not the basis for an accommodation.”

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. I’m Sandy Murillo for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

For more information, click here.

 

Air Date: August 15, 2021
Don’t call me inspirational

Have you ever wondered if you’re saying the wrong thing? I’m Maureen Reid with “The Disability Minute.”

Let’s face it, language is confusing. Meanings change, and what may have been acceptable once may be out of favor now. On top of that, preferred terms often differ from person to person.

For example, as someone who is blind, I don’t like being called inspirational because I take the bus to work. Life with a disability is my normal. Being someone’s inspiration makes me feel like they have lower expectations because of my disability, even if they mean well.

Others, however, may not mind “inspirational.” In most cases, it comes down to personal preference.

So, how can you know what language to use around people with disabilities? In my experience, it always helps to ask.

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. I’m Maureen Reid for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

 

Air Date: August 8, 2021
Clinical Trial shaping the future of vision technology

How are three local organizations continuing Chicago’s spirit of innovation to help people with disabilities? I’m Maureen Reid with The Disability Minute.

The Chicago Lighthouse, the Illinois Institute of Technology, and Rush ​University Medical Center have launched a clinical trial that may help people who are completely blind regain some light perception. The Intracortical Visual Prosthesis, or ICVP, is a group of wireless implants that are approximately the size of a pencil eraser that connect directly to the brain’s visual cortex.

The ICVP will not restore normal vision, but it is a step in that direction. Principal Investigator Dr. Philip Troyk likens trial participants to John Glenn paving the way for Neil Armstrong. “Much like the astronauts, the experiences that they tell us will help us shape the technology for future recipients and future systems.”

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. I’m Maureen Reid for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

For more information, click here.

 

Air Date: August 1, 2021
Accessibility Rocks!

With music festivals across Chicago back on the calendar, how can attendees with disabilities get the most out of their experience? I’m Ben Chargot with “The Disability Minute.”

To start things off right, most big festivals like Lollapalooza, Riot Fest, and Pitchfork have designated drop-off and pick-up areas for people with disabilities and entrances that are less crowded or allow early entry.

Once you’re inside, staff at access and information booths can answer questions, provide assistance, and hook you up with a wristband to enter accessible viewing areas.

Space in these viewing areas is limited, so you’ll want to arrive early. Sign Language interpreters will also be available at most stages, but it is unclear whether they can interpret mumblecore. Enjoy the show!

Produced by people with disabilities at The Chicago Lighthouse. I’m Ben Chargot for NewsRadio 780 and 105.9 FM.

For more information, click here.


For more information, please contact:
Angela D’Antonio
(312)447-3246
angela.dantonio@chicagolighthouse.org

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