Seniors Program Chicago – Over-The-Phone Book Club for Seniors – To Kill A Mockingbird

For the health and well-being of our clients during COVID -19, The Chicago Lighthouse has temporarily suspended in-person seniors programs. We will let you know when we resume in-person programming. For now, all seniors programs will take place over the phone in the comfort of your homes until further notice.

Please direct all program inquiries and RSVPs to Melissa Wittenberg at T: (847) 510-2060 or melissa.wittenberg@chicagolighthouse.org.

CALL-IN INSTRUCTIONS: After you RSVP for any/all programs that you’d like to participate in, here’s how to call into each of the programs – we will use the same call-in number for all programs:

To join any of the programs, dial 312-229-4730. It will then ask for you to enter the Conference ID: 362327 followed by #. It will ask if you are the leader and since you are not the leader, continue waiting and it will then ask you to say your name, and once you do, press #. You will then be admitted into the program.

Most participants will use the free Talking Books player. The audio book player will be mailed to you at no cost, as well as all audio books. We can help you complete an application if you are not yet enrolled in the program. Please RSVP to Melissa in advance of the program at: (847) 510-2060.

This month, we will discuss Harper Lee’s 1961 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic. Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature about a child’s view of race and justice in the Depression-era South.